2008
09.18

Greetings, my name is Jordi Scrubbings and I am not a scientist, I am just attempting to write like one.

In the last year I have been witness to a new type of species dwelling in the area of St. Petersburg, Florida. Although many deny their existence or claim they do not reveal themselves often enough for believability, I have seen them too often to think that they are not real. Through dozens of visits to the area and tireless observation, I have decided to take on the responsibility of document this new phenomenon for scientific prosperity.

The sun bears down on Tropicana Field, yet inside the 18-year old establishment the temperature is a cool, constant 72 degrees. A baseball field lay in the middle of the building and although some would say that is where the action is, my observations tell a far different story. It is in the stands surrounding the baseball field where these new, exciting, boisterous, charasmatic creatures dwell.

From my perch in the upper deck I can see most of the stadium. The only area outside my view is a small area beneath me, an area marked by announce booths and luxury boxes – hardly the subjects of study. More often than not I am surrounded by the beasts. They consume me and smother me with sounds of cowbells and voices. Led by a fuzzy whatchamacallit named Raymond, they call themselves “Rays’ Fans” and have outshouted or drowned out every invading voice in Tropicana Field this year.


First, allow me to introduce “Cowbellicus Loudicus Fanicus”. A staple at Tropicana Field, Cowbellicus has perhaps the loudest cowbell in the habitat. Combined with his flamboyant looks and optimistic demeanor, Cowbellicus Loudicus Fanicus is unmistakable. Despite the somewhat aggressive nature seen in the above picture, Cowbellicus Loudicus Fanicus is not considered dangerous. As long as you wear earplugs.


This species here is “Confidenticus Fanicus”. New to Tropicana Field, Confidenticus Fanicus has faith were faith did not exist before. He cheers when things go right, and curses the visiting team when things go wrong. Although most Confidenticus Fanicus are fun-loving creatures, some do try to provoke alien species with derogatory chants and comments. When visitors to Confidenticus Fanicus’s habitat attempt to respond, Fanicus usually replies with the phrase “Look at the standings.”


Here you see a few examples of “Hotchickitus Rays Fanicus”. Although Hotchickitus inhabited Tropicana Field before 2008, never before has the species been seen in such large numbers.


Here you can see “Exciticus Young Fanicus”. The most new of new species to Tropicana Field, Exciticus Young Fanicus carries with it the hopes and dreams of a new generation. A generation that did not have to suffer through the Vince Namoli-era or have their eyes burnt watching Dewon Brazelton. This is the future.


Finally, last but not least, “Jordicus Scrubbicus”, seen here with mohawk.

This study inspired by Deadspin.com.

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  1. LOL Jordi, good work! I’m particularly pleased with “Jordicus Scrubbicus”, of course. :-)

  2. re: “Hotchickitus Rays Fanicus”

    From L-R…Not even at 2:00am, Maybe, Only at 2:00am on Guavaween, I’ll pass and Yes please.

  3. Prof:

    Unfortunately there is no pic of Jenn Sterger in new Rays apparel.

    All: Jack Sikma posted a link to an article about Rays fans not showing up. I deleted it. Not because I am not open to opposing views, but because I am very opposed to unsolicited postings of someone else’s website in my comments. He listed no opinions or description, just a link. If you want to find it, be my guest, but no one pimps a site on my site without asking me first.

  4. The MSM disagrees with your view on the Rays attendance. As do many of their ‘fans’, as do I.

    http://www.bradenton.com/baseball/story/897124.html