2009
12.09

I was working on this post a while back and kinda abandoned it. It was one of those posts that definitely didn’t fit in on ye olden site. But after reading this article a few weeks back about the upcoming release of rapper T.I., I figured I would dust off the notes and start writing it again.

gun_in_the_cityA few years ago, I regularly received one of the National Rifle Association’s official publications, a magazine called First Freedom. Now before you start snickering, I think the NRA is a good organization that stands for something positive. They sometimes get a bad rap by the media, but that’s not the point of my story. The point is the NRA’s magazine.

Throughout the months and maybe even years that I received First Freedom, I slowly started noticing something. There was an overwhelming lack of color in the magazine. No, it wasn’t printed in black and white, I mean pigmentation color. Probably 90%, if not more, of the people profiled in First Freedom were of European descent, in other words, white. I am probably not far off in thinking that the demographic for First Freedom was the average conservative-thinking, middle-class, middle-American. The magazine was written for the lifestyle of someone who liked his (and to a small extent “her”) Budweiser or Miller Lite, his country music, and his NASCAR.

(Again, I am just making a point about the demographic, and I am not saying there is anything wrong with this. Magazines have to sell and First Freedom knew its demographic and catered to it well.)

But what about the gun-owner who did not live in the fields of Wyoming or could not give a whit about Travis Tritt or a fart about Dale Earnhart? What about the gun-owner who had other interests, ones that did not fit the white, conservative stereotype? What about the completely legal gun owners who liked hip-hop and basketball players not named Karl Malone? First Freedom never addressed that demographic.

To fill the void left by First Freedom, and to give urban gun owners something to read, I would like to propose the idea for a publication called “Urban Armsman: A Magazine For the Urban Gun Collector“. Although Urban Armsman would borrow a few things from First Freedom, sections such as new products and incidences where gun owners protected themselves, Urban Armsman would also provide gun owners in cities with information on where to shoot, where they can carry legally, and what laws and regulations they should be concerned with. It would also have several articles on education and proper use, promoting safety as its number one priority, as well as features on celebrity gun collections. Who wouldn’t want to read about the weapons stashes of T.I., Shyne, and Plaxico Burress? And you know Puff Daddy has to have some sort of firearm protection nearby.

I know there are some cities where carrying a gun is as legal as carrying a vial of crack, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t potential readers in every city. For those areas, Urban Armsman would similar to High Times or some car racing magazines. The question is not whether or not there is a market, the question is how much longer will urban gun owners put up with articles on Dick Cheney, safaris in Africa, and the North Dakota high school champion clay shooting team?

(Photo found at http://andrewmiguelez.com/portfolio/html/graphic_design.html.)

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  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Jordi Scrubbings, Gold Country FNRA. Gold Country FNRA said: A gun mag for the urban aficionado http://bit.ly/5jy38E [...]

  2. [...] Rifle Association, I am extremely critical of them. As I wrote a few weeks ago, I think they do a horrible job of reaching out to people outside of their stereotypical demographic. Unfortunately, because the NRA seemingly only targets (no pun intended) white, suburban/rural, [...]